“Complementarity?” Yeah. Here, Spooky Quantum Pairs Throw Physicists A (DT like) Curve Ball

Spooky Quantum Particle Pairs Fly Like Weird Curveballs

Date:
June 4, 2018
Source:
Georgia Institute of Technology
Summary:
Some particles that can be in two places at the same time and are not just particles but also waves, in this case, fermions, appear to move in even weirder ways than previously thought. Theoretical physicists applied extreme computing power for a week to predict the movements of fermions by including quantum optics, or light-like, ideas in their mathematical, theoretical modeling.
This is an artist’s depiction of what a group of atoms looks like when they merge to a wave-like state. This occurs under ultra-cooling that drops atoms’ temperature to near absolute zero, the coldest possible temperature in the universe. This is not an image of something done in this Georgia Tech study but is intended to help readers picture the particle-wave duality the study considers along with other factors.
Credit: National Institute of Standards and Technology

Curvy baseball pitches have surprising things in common with quantum particles described in a new physics study, though the latter fly much more weirdly.


In fact, ultracold paired particles called fermions must behave even weirder than physicists previously thought, according to theoretical physicists from the Georgia Institute of Technology, who mathematically studied their flight patterns. Already, flying quantum particles were renowned for their weirdness.

To understand why, start with similarities to a baseball then add significant differences.

A pitcher imparts spin, momentum, and energy to a baseball when throwing a curveball, a change-up, or a slider. Fermions’ funny flights are likewise carved by spins, momenta, and energies, but also by powerful quantum eccentricities like entanglement, which Albert Einstein once called “spooky action at a distance” between quantum particles.

In the new study, the researchers even predicted that the particles can act like different quantum balls called bosons to mimic the manner that photons, or [wave/] particles of light, fly.  A simplified explanation of these ultracold paired particles and their odd flights is below.

Read Complete Article? https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180604124908.htm

Comment Summary: Fermions are strange pilots. They fly their “paired particles” in strange ways that imitate a baseball pitcher’s curve-balls and sliders — adding spin and other kinds of “angular momentum,” which, although it may be “conserved,” can still do strange things to one’s flight patterns.  Here, they’ve been caught on cam — in technicolor.

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